Community Trends, Chatbots and More

As we begin to move forward our human relationship, with technology (the machine), is beginning to bound us into certain communities. This whole idea of being a part of something, whether we want to or not, is beginning to set the stage for what’s next with the relationship between humans and machines.

online communities(Source: Google Images)

After reading the text, this week, Spilka stated throughout Chapter 6 this priority of, “Because I sense that there are human relationships beyond my machine and because I can communicate with other people in a virtual environment, together we will form some kind of community and culture based on those relationships and communication” (Spilka, 2010). We are all striving to be a part of what’s in front of our screen, whether we are searching, lurking or participating in conversations on social media, discussion boards and forums and even asking “Google” for our next answer.

Spilka goes further to highlight that both defined and undefined communities have boundaries. The author states, “In order to form a community, some people have to be included and other excluded” (Spilka, 2010).

In this blog, the author mentions the 5 important online community trends for 2018.

1. Platform Convergence
2. Automation of Community Management
3. Blockchain Technology
4. A Rise in Ideation Communities
5. Data Will Lead to Actionable Insights
Natasha, the author of, The Five Important Online Community Trends for 2018, says, “Online communities, on the other hand, offer an online ‘get-away’ with trustworthy, relevant news and the potential to create real involvement.” This was an interesting note in which the author relates these online communities, to a user’s ‘get-away.” While I began to consider what Natasha was exactly referring to, it made me realize why she coined these communities as “getaways.”

These ‘getaways’ are becoming the focal point to more than what Spilka notes in Chapter 7 as norms and rules pertaining to “Universal and particular” approaches to online environments (Spilka, 2010). They are becoming the basis for companies, advertisers and other users who are hoping to learn more about a product or service in which someone has shared their own experience with. Essentially, individuals are using these online “communities” to make their products better, share their own experiences and allow for a continued discourse between members of a company, individuals who share common interests with this product or service and for a stronger relationship between each of these “particular” communities. Even as we begin to associate ourselves as a product user, designer, or even a member of a certain company we began to “belong” to that network or community in a sense. Further, Spilka makes the connection that these “online communities” in which users share their feedback are not only helpful for the companies, brands and other individuals/potential customers, but also for technical communicators. Spilka states, “The digital environment gives writers more effective mechanisms than ever for obtaining this feedback. It also helps writers interact with and respond to readers: they can even respond immediately to readers’ needs. And, of course, writers can use reader feedback both to enhance their understanding of readers and to improved documents” (Spilka, 2010).

Take a look at this blog which mentions 23 different ways online communities are making an impact on a customer’s experience, not only for other like-minded customers, but also for the company and organization.

In all of this week’s context pertaining to communities, technology and how we “belong” to each of these communities whether we classify ourselves as part of a community or not, these interactions and our presence are shaping the future. It’s interesting to discover that Microsoft currently has a bot framework in existence which can referred to as, “Microsoft Azure.”

microsoft bot framework(Source: Google Images)

As technology continues to advance, do you see these communities “online” becoming stronger, weaker, less frequented, etc.?

Additional question that pertain to these “online” communities include:

  1. Will we be communicating more with chatbots?
  2. Will we be communicating more with actual people behind the screen?
  3. Will we be communicating with something completely new that’s never been exposed of before in these “online” communities or what will the “new online” era resemble?

chat bot.jpg

(Source: Google Images)

 

Resources:

Spilka, R. (2010). Digital literacy for technical communication: 21st century theory and practice. New York: Routledge.

Posted on November 11, 2018, in Social Media. Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. Wow–intriguing material here! Great use of Spilka chapters to bring in these outside (and 2018-authored) sources. I wonder if you want to explore these “getaways” as the new “community” and how that connects to bots in your final paper. I’d not heard of Azure before, but it’s something tech comm/web designers & marketers will surely have to contend with, right?

    • Hi Professor Pignetti,

      This is a great idea with further exploring the “getaways” as the new “community.” This would be interesting to tie in this information, additional research and how the bots are being integrated within each of these realms. I’m fairly new to Microsoft Azure, and I am curious to learn more about this platform. I know this platform has 2 components with first focusing on infrastructure as a service (storing, computing) and the second component is a platform as a service to network and connect with others. It’s interesting to see how this bridges what currently exists for companies into a new “operating” system if you will.

      Expanding on this in greater detail, I discovered more information on robotic technology that Microsoft is integrating with Microsoft 10. Specifically, they are working on training robots to conduct virtual reality with no coding involved. This very new for 2018 and in this article they outline more on these integrations and advancements: https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-is-bringing-the-robot-operating-system-to-windows-10/.

      Thank you,

      Kim

      • Excellent! This sounds like a plan. Let me know if you have questions or concerns as you begin to put together the proposal.

  2. Hi Kim,

    I really enjoyed reading your post this week.

    In referencing the ‘open social’ blog, I like how you referenced Natasha’s top five online community trends for 2018. However, I might disagree with two of her placements:

    Though there’s no shame in ‘Automation of Community Management’ coming in second, I can’t help but wonder if this should be number one. After all, in an increasingly demanding world (at work and outside of work), automation helps us save significant time, money, and energy. But, I might be a tad biased, since I created and presented several automation-themed PowerPoints in my previous position.

    Also, I am surprised that ‘Data Will Lead to Actionable Insights’ is coming in last. After all, as any Content Manager will attest to, data is a major driving force behind any company’s success. Personally, I wonder if many of these very Content Managers would rank this trend atop or near the top of most lists. Just food for thought.

    Nice work!

    ~Jeff

    • I like your questions here, Jeff. If Kim explores this as a final paper topic I hope she acknowledges these and sees what additional research says. Thanks for the push!

      • Hi Dr. Pignetti,

        Thank you for your positive feedback. I often ask my classmates ‘Devil’s Advocate’ questions, not to try and trip them up, but to try and stimulate the thought-process while encouraging analysis from various angles.

        When I was younger, when asked such questions, I would generally become rather flustered. However, I have since grown past that and will now welcome such questions with an open mind.

        Thank you!
        Jeff

  3. Hi Dr. Pignetti,

    Thank you for your positive feedback. I often ask my classmates ‘Devil’s Advocate’ questions, not to try and trip them up, but to try and stimulate the thought-process while encouraging analysis from various angles.

    When I was younger, when asked such questions, I would generally become rather flustered. However, I have since grown past that and will now welcome such questions with an open mind.

    Thank you!
    Jeff

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